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In Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita," the title character's husband's name is Richard ("Dick") Schiller.

Don't hold me to it, but I once heard a radio production (or it may have been a movie, not necessarily based on "Lolita," in which the character is mentioned) in which someone pronounced it as "Skiller," the way the word "schedule" is rendered "skejoole" in American English.

Is there some kind of allusion-rich joke on Nabokov's part that I'm not "getting," a nuance I'm not aware of (the book is full of linguistic tricks of all kinds)? I mean, the author of "The Robbers" and "Mary Stuart" is still "Shiller" from sea to shining sea, so what gives?

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For what it is worth, in Russian version (that is translated into Russian by Nabokov) he is Шиллер as in shiller Скиллер as in skiller.

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    I don't think that's altogether accurate. My familiarity with the Cyrillic alphabet may be superficial, but I do believe that Скиллер is pronounced Skiller: loveread.ws/read_book.php?id=235&p=80 – Ricky Nov 24 '15 at 1:38
  • @Ricky You are completely right. My memory failed me. Скиллер it is. – user58697 Nov 24 '15 at 1:52

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