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Sentence 1 (a question in fact):

Who is the speaker to whom speaking what is situation.

This is written my Literature and Composition teacher. The answer is "dramatic situation". But confusingly the question start with "who".

Here is a sentence with similar structure.

David had a stick with which to scare his cat.

Using the same structure to interpret the sentence by my teacher, it sounds like the speaker is speaking "what is situation" to himself or herself.

Sentence 2 (from my physics textbook):

We wish to locate the point of application of the single force F, where the effect on the rotation of the object is the same as that of the individual particles

The "same as" comparison is confusing. The grammar here makes the sentence sounds like at that particular location, the effect (of unknown source) on the rotation of the entire object is the same as the effect (presumably from the same source) on the rotation of the particles (comprising the object).

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    That first sentence is gibberish. But then I can't make much sense out of the rest of your question either. Except that you seem to have asked 3 or 4 different questions, and you should only ask one at a time. – Hot Licks Nov 22 '15 at 21:00
  • Can you understand my second sentence?@HotLicks – most venerable sir Nov 22 '15 at 21:01
  • You mean "This is written my Literature and Composition teacher"? – Hot Licks Nov 22 '15 at 21:03
  • No the third yellow box – most venerable sir Nov 22 '15 at 21:05
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    "We wish to locate..."? That appears to make sense, if you have a modest understanding of physics. Saying precisely what it means would require some context and probably a smattering of familiarity with the author's writing style. But my first impression is that the "individual particles" are the source of the force (eg, they're air particles impinging on some solid object). The statement is attempting to determine the "center of force" for the particles as a group. – Hot Licks Nov 22 '15 at 21:10
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I'm sorry that you have a composition teacher who can't write a coherent English sentence.

Who is the speaker to whom speaking what is situation?

is garbled. Possibly it means

Who is the speaker, to whom is he speaking, and what is the situation?

but it's impossible to see the answer "dramatic situation" fitting the original.

Your sentence

David had a stick with which to scare his cat.

hardly has the same structure as your first sentence, mostly because this sentence is grammatical.

In your physics text, the source of the force isn't unknown; it's F. The problem is that the antecedent of that isn't particularly clear, but this is a common definition of center of gravity and the meaning is

We wish to locate the point of application of the single force F, where the effect on the rotation of the object is the same as the effect of F on the individual particles of the object.

  • For the last yellow box. I think the book should have "that ON" instead of "that OF"? – most venerable sir Nov 22 '15 at 21:20
  • What does "of application" mean here? Relevant? – most venerable sir Nov 22 '15 at 21:22
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    @Doeser No; the point of application of the single force F is "the point at which the single force F is applied"; it's the point F acts upon. – Andrew Leach Nov 22 '15 at 21:36
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    @Doeser No, it means to impinge on as "The application of the force of a hammer blow on the head of a nail." Technically, here it means cause to accelerate in the direction of the force and in magnitude inversely proportional to the mass. – deadrat Nov 22 '15 at 21:36
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    Syntactically, what's the antecedent of that? Effect? rotation? Thank goodness the cat arrived. I'll edit my answer. – deadrat Nov 22 '15 at 22:21
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Yes, the first sentence and the second are ungrammatical. What is the context of the first one? Are you supposed to restructure it? Or is it some sort of "fill in the blank'? The second sentence: "David had a stick with which to scare his ______" is missing an object. An example would be: dog, brother, attacker, etc. So: David had a stick with which to scare his brother.

Last sentence: I haven't taken physics for a while now. I'll leave that to someone who understands the context better than I.

  • Actually, the second would make sense if David and a buddy were each driving a goat to market, and the context implied that "his" meant "his goat". – Hot Licks Nov 22 '15 at 21:11

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