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  1. People are not aware about cleanliness.
  2. People are not educated about cleanliness.

Do you think that both of the sentences stated above are correct? If both are correct, which one is best? And what are the differences between the meaning of them?

  • I am aware that there is man with an axe standing right behind me. – Mitch Nov 16 '15 at 23:38
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To be aware of something is to have general knowledge, particularly regarding its existence. If people are not aware of cleanliness, it means that it doesn't even factor into their mental calculation.

To be educated about something is to have learned, specific knowledge, which goes beyond just the existence of something and into the realm of detailed information. If people are not educated about cleanliness, it means that they have never been taught (via a teacher, book, parent, etc.) about how to be clean and/or the importance of being clean.

As an example: If I wash my hands without soap, I am aware of cleanliness (because I washed my hands), but I'm not educated about cleanliness (because I didn't know that I should use soap for effective cleaning).

Usually, being aware of something is a prerequisite to being educated about it. Examples in which someone is educated about something but not aware generally involve the person not paying attention to his/her environment.

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This:

People are not educated about cleanliness.

Would mean that people aren't taught about hygiene.

Where as this:

People are not aware about the cleanliness.

...is a fragment sentence; people are not aware about the cleanliness of what? If you'd rather use 'aware' than 'educated' then a better structure would be:

People are not aware of the need for cleanliness.

Or if you're trying to say that people are disinterested in cleanliness

People are not aware of cleanliness.

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