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In Hard Girls by Martina Cole there is this sentence (it's on Google books if you want context):

Patrick had once remarked that Jennifer James was harder than a monk's jockstrap

I'm a native English speaker, so I have some idea what the author is getting at. But the context implies hard as in tough, and the phrase implies hard as in hard-to-get.

I would really appreciate an explanation of that phrase!

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    I think it means "since nothing gets in and nothing can (no matter how much it might want to) get out it must be as hard as admantium." If Jennifer Jones is harder than that she must be one tough broad. – Misneac Nov 15 '15 at 20:24
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It means "since nothing gets in and nothing can (no matter how much it might want to) get out, it must be as hard as adamantium". If Jennifer Jones is harder than that she must be one tough broad.

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    Should not that be adamantium, if you mean the comic-book stuff, or perhaps its root, adamant, fr. Gk. ἀδάμας? – Brian Donovan Nov 15 '15 at 21:14
  • You're absolutely right. I fixed it. My only excuse is that it's been a long time since I read Wolverine or listened to Stu Goddard. – Misneac Nov 15 '15 at 22:17

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