1

The message is “hammered home” that refugees must find jobs and pay their bills, says Ruben Chandrasekar, head of the IRC’s Baltimore office.

I encountered this sentence when I read the economist. Does "hammered home" mean to build a home?

This is the whole paragraph:

The message is “hammered home” that refugees must find jobs and pay their bills, says Ruben Chandrasekar, head of the IRC’s Baltimore office. Few need telling. Refugees “know what it is like to lose a home”, so rent is the first bill they pay, he notes. They “penny pinch” to build up savings. Much talent goes to waste: refugees with advanced degrees work as car-park attendants or wheelchair-pushers at Baltimore airport. But still the city has much to offer. Houses are cheaper than in Washington, an hour to the south. Unlike many suburbs, the city offers public transport and a diverse population. Such diversity is an economic boon as well as a comfort, providing niche markets for small businesses. Baltimore is now home to Nepalese grocery shops and to a car service that takes Darfuri refugees to work.

The link of the whole article is http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21677240-hardscrabble-baltimore-finds-kindness-brings-its-own-rewards-city-wants-more

  • 1
    I suggest searching it on google. It's a pretty common expression meaning "strongly emphasized". – Misneac Nov 15 '15 at 7:05
  • Wiktionary has the meaning: (idiomatic) To repeatedly or continually emphasise (an opinion or idea) until or so that a person or group of people understands it. – user140086 Nov 15 '15 at 7:16
3

This is a metaphor. When a nail is hammered home it is driven in to the point that it is in its proper and final position, not to be removed. Similarly, the notions presented by the IRC head are strongly emphasised and asserted to the point that they must be accepted and become almost unquestionable, a final mental position.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.