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This is especially important for writers who are non-native English speakers—try to find native English speakers to review your writing.

  • In that sentence it appears to be substituting for a colon. – Robusto Nov 12 '15 at 14:19
  • @Robusto - I see we disagree. You say colon. I say semicolon. Could you perhaps give your reasoning and/or give a critique of my answer. (I'll try to find an authoritative source for my claim). – chasly from UK Nov 12 '15 at 14:21
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    @chaslyfromUK: I don't think we disagree, I just think my interpretation may be broader than yours. One of the uses of a colon is to set off material that is a direct result or follow-on of the (usually) independent clause that precedes it. "This rule keep in your heart: always be faithful." That said, using a semicolon there feels weak to me. So maybe there is some disagreement after all. ^_^ – Robusto Nov 12 '15 at 14:25
  • I think maybe the author of the phrase was wise to use an em dash—no-one could argue with that! – chasly from UK Nov 12 '15 at 14:31
  • I would also use a colon. Or write either Especially important for writers who are non-native English speakers is to find native English speakers to review their writing or Finding native English speakers to review their writing is especially important for writers who are not native English speakers. Or: Non-native speakers would do well to find native English speakers to review their writing. – NES Nov 12 '15 at 14:42
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This is especially important for writers who are non-native English speakers—try to find native English speakers to review your writing.

This could be a full-stop (period):

This is especially important for writers who are non-native English speakers. Try to find native English speakers to review your writing.

or it could be a semicolon:

This is especially important for writers who are non-native English speakers; try to find native English speakers to review your writing.

A comma is not strong enough to separate independent clauses.

Edit

There is a case for using a colon as well. See the comment by Robusto.

  • I see. so you mean sir, if that's a dependent clause probably I can use comma (,) or em dash (--) for separation. – Caspersky12 Nov 12 '15 at 14:30
  • Did you write the original phrase? The em dash is correct in that situation. Yes, a comma can be used with a dependent clause. However there isn't a dependent clause in your example so you can't use it there. – chasly from UK Nov 12 '15 at 14:37

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