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There's an idiom for never being satisfied with what you have and always looking out for something or someone better, particularly in reference to dating. The phrase is something like

Keep one eye on the door

referring to watching the door for the next new hot person to walk in the room.

My google searches have not resulted in any hits, which make me believe that I don't have the wording quite right. Does anyone know what this phrase is supposed to be?

  • It's not a phrase but I'd call that opportunism. – Bookeater Nov 10 '15 at 20:49
  • Try "with one eye on the door.," omit keep in your search. Alternatively watching with an eye to the main chance. But, if the watcher is watching for nasties as well as opportunities, then 'being on the qui vive' or 'with a weather eye open,' – Hugh Nov 10 '15 at 21:36
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    Related: the grass is always greener on the other side. – Barmar Nov 10 '15 at 21:59
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    Also related: "the best is the ennemy of the good" (from Voltaire - "La Begueule"). And, as usual, the Bible provides a quote: "Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this is also vanity and grasping after the wind." Ecclesiast 6:9 - King James 2000 Bible. – Graffito Nov 11 '15 at 1:50
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    @Hugh I did that (and took out references to the song by Helen Austin), and found what I was thinking of! It's a quote from the movie Latter Days: "I mean, LA is a city where everyone dances with one eye on the door, like we're all waiting for something better to walk in. ..." – David K Nov 16 '15 at 16:27
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There is a phrase that captures the idea perfectly, although it is not exclusively used for dating: Always chasing rainbows.

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Looking for a Bigger Better Deal (BBD): An acronym for 'Bigger Better Deal', a term basically used when a man or woman temporarily makes due with someone as his or her mate, while actually still in search for a mate that bears superior superficial qualities for an ideal lover. e.g., 'That guy's mail-order Russian bride is looking to score a BBD." (Urbandictionary.com)

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