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Adam is the boss of Ben, Carl and David. 
Ben is the boss of Edward and Frank. 
Carl is the boss of nobody.
David is the boss of George and Harry.

A word or short phrase that would distinguish Ben and David from Carl as they relate to Adam.

Adam's [WORD] are Ben and David.  His other subordinate is Carl.

If there is not a single word, a very short phrase might work.

Edit: Answer a few questions:

1) Is Adam a CEO: Adam is not necessarily the top level, although he could be.

2) In what company? Under what structure? Private sector business.

3) Why do you need this word or phrase? It is for a section title/header for a report that has information about how the direct reports are keeping up with managing the people under them. (How well their 'children' are keeping up with tasks related to their 'grandchildren' in the hierarchy)

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    Middle management? – bib Nov 10 '15 at 16:12
  • Why do you need this word or phrase? In what company? Under what structure? Is Adam a CEO? – user140086 Nov 10 '15 at 16:13
  • @bib: Or line management for those not so far up the greasy pole. Per Wikipedia, ... unlike the line management, middle management is considered to be a senior (or semi-executive) management position, with respective salary and a package of benefits. – FumbleFingers Nov 10 '15 at 17:34
  • Have you considered hiring some women? – Steven Littman Nov 11 '15 at 2:25
  • Would it make you feel better if I changed them to some alternating gender and various ethnic names? The names are the first ones I thought of in alphabetical order. – 182764125216 Nov 11 '15 at 4:14
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Consider:

  • submanager:

    a manager who is subordinate to another manager
    Wiktionary
    a secondary or assistant manager
    Collins Dictionary

  • deputy:

    a person who is the next most important person below a business manager, a head of a school, a political leader, etc. and who does the person’s job when he or she is away.
    I'm acting as deputy till the manager returns.

  • second-in-command:

    someone who is ​almost as ​important as the ​person in ​charge:
    Well, if the ​manager isn't ​available I'd like to ​speak to the second-in-command.

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