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First of all, I am not a native English speaker and my understanding of the terms may be biased by other languages I know.. ( hence the question )

In a very official letter I am trying to refer to myself without using the explicit word "myself" or "me" for fear of repetition ( too many too close ) .

The Phrase i am looking for is along the lines of

" ..and regarding the proposed meeting Between (me) and X "

  1. Can I use the term "my person" in this context ? E.g.

" ..and regarding the proposed meeting between X and my person ".

or

" ..and regarding the proposed meeting with my person ".

would a native (American ) English speaker understand it ? find it strange ?

  • Alternatively , what other options ( synonyms ) do I have ?

  • What is the correct way or context to use "my person" as a substitute for "me" ( if any ) ?

Edit I - Clarification :

  • This letter is for a third party regarding a meeting between my self and another (second ) party . It is regarding a large company´s board of directors affair, and it involved many meeting and many parties ( some persons, some companies ) but almost always myself . It is potentially be read by both the board itself and other authorities .

  • The question is more about the overall "feeling" of the letter . I have a very strong feeling about repeating the same word too many time too closely . Whenever I read a paragraph that repeats the same word or terms too frequently I can not escape the feeling of it being poorly constructed . Maybe it is just me , but I can not shake it off and I always try to use synonyms in any language I write ..

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    Using "my person" to refer to yourself is, er, "quaint", and strongly risks being confused with "my people", meaning your representatives. I strongly advise against its use. (There's absolutely nothing wrong with "myself".) – Hot Licks Nov 9 '15 at 2:38
  • Something that might work is "this party". But if you're not comfortable with English I'd advise sticking to simpler language. – Hot Licks Nov 9 '15 at 3:02
  • "I have a very strong feeling about repeating the same word too many times in a sentence . Whenever I read a paragraph that repeats the same words or terms too frequently, I can not escape the feeling of it being poorly constructed . Maybe it is just me , but I can not shake it off....." It's not just you, I also do not like that aspect. I think you should just go with it and move on, most people (even native speakers), will not notice nor care. Overall your sentence structure is fine, If it is a problem that must resolved, then I would try: "...between myself and name/title". – JCG Nov 9 '15 at 3:22
  • '... between X and myself' in a formal register; '... between X and me' in conversation. – Edwin Ashworth Nov 9 '15 at 11:10
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Although it might be slightly ambiguous (unless you proposed the meeting [yourself]), you could avoid “me” and “myself” (but not “my”) by taking ownership of the meeting (even if you didn’t propose it) with:

..and regarding my proposed/scheduled/upcoming meeting with X.

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Alternately to "me/myself," which unarguably would be my preferred choice here, you might want to consider the circumlocution yours truly.

yours truly

For whatever reason of modesty (or false modesty) that prevented speakers or writers from using the first-person singular pronoun "I," the "yours truly" convention was established. It came from the standard letter closing. It sounded mannered when it was first used in the 19th century and even more so now. Other equally stilted circumlocutions for "I" or "me" used in writing are "your reporter" (still found in alumni class notes) and "your correspondent." Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price

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  • 19th century sounds about right. Recommending 'stilted circumlocutions' even with caveats is of little benefit. – Edwin Ashworth Nov 9 '15 at 11:05

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