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I want to say the following sentence,

You will now eat, at my house

This type of usage, although not common in the US or UK is very common for speakers from Europe or Russia when they speak English. My question is what is this type of tense or verbal conjugation called? Background: I want to write that so and so said this to me, and this is a common usage for European English speakers.

Based on the comments, here is an edit: I do not have a problem with this usage. I would like to say that the xxx tense usage is perfectly normal in Russian. What is xxx?

  • Under what social conditions is this sentence utterred, and what is its understood meaning there? Among native speakers, this could be considered rude in some situations. Oh, and it's not a matter of grammar or tense or verbal conjugation. It's different cultural assumptions and pragmatics. – John Lawler Nov 2 '15 at 20:53
  • It is used for the approximate native phrase, "You should at my home after this". – bissi Nov 2 '15 at 20:59
  • Do you have a problem with using the adverb "now" with the future tense? This usage is totally OK, with different meanings depending on the context. – Færd Nov 2 '15 at 21:09
  • To answer your question, the relevant choices are either indicative mood or imperative mood. Indicative mood are the most common, and express a fact (or belief, etc.). Strictly speaking, the sentence is indicative. However, the tone of the sentence clearly implies it is a command/order (or firm invitation), which is the tone normally found in the imperative mood. The standard imperative construction would be "Eat at my house now!" (or something similar). – Nonnal Nov 2 '15 at 21:15
  • To me the interesting part of the sentence is the comma. This might suggest "at my house" is a clarification or afterthought. If something more direct is wanted then the comma could be dropped. – Henry Nov 3 '15 at 0:40
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The relevant choices are either indicative mood or imperative mood. Indicative mood are the most common, and express a fact (or belief, etc.). Strictly speaking, the sentence is indicative. However, the tone of the sentence clearly implies it is a command/order (or firm invitation), which is the tone normally found in the imperative mood. The standard imperative construction would be "Eat at my house now!" (or something similar).

As an aside: To soften the tone for a native English listener, one might consider rewording it to something like, "I insist, you must come eat at my house," or "Please come eat at my house; I insist." The word insist likely offers the blend of firmness but friendliness that is likely present in the Russian but absent from the original English sentence. It implies that the speaker is trying to be helpful and doesn't want the listener to turn down the offer merely to prevent the speaker from taking the trouble to make dinner.

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