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I have stumbled upon a sentence while reading a book.

While these self-defeating, stress producing patterns take their toll on your health and on your closest relationships, they maintain a firm grip on your behavior(...)

Can I re-write the sentence like this?

While these self-defeating, stress producing patterns take their toll on your health and closest relationships, they maintain a firm grip on your behavior(...)

If both of them are correct, what is the difference then? Which one should I use?

Thanks a lot!

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    You can. The second is less wordy but still conveys the same meaning as the first sentence. Good insight. – michael_timofeev Nov 2 '15 at 13:49
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They are identical in meaning and both are grammatically correct.

You have an example of a compound prepositional phrase. The difference is between:

(prep) (obj) and (prep) (obj)

versus

(prep) ((obj) and (obj))

where (prep) = preposition and (obj) = the object of the preposition

You can use either form because the prepositions are the same (on). Some grammarians would also insist that the two objects must be parallel (as your example objects are).

A similar example is:

I eat with a fork and with a spoon.

I eat with a fork and a spoon.

I eat with a fork and spoon.

Beware when the words you are joining with and are structurally quite different, however. The following examples can sound awkward to some readers:

I am a fish and swimming through the water. (not parallel; avoid)

I am a fish and am swimming through the water. (better)

I like to eat my lunch on time and a bench. (not parallel; avoid)

I like to eat my lunch on time and on a bench. (better)

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