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Or are they synonyms? My guess is that fixtures are matches that haven't been played yet...

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    In the US, a 'match' is a common term in sports for a or some part of a meeting of teams. In the US, a'fixture' has absolutely nothing to do with sports (it is used mostly in the context 'electrical' or 'light fixture'. Is your usage in terms of UK English?
    – Mitch
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 13:25
  • @Rathony Excellent... a new word (well, usage) for me then. Looking it up online, they say mostly 'British: an event that takes place regularly', so I think newer in the US, also 'fixture' is definitely used in sports but can easily be used elsewhere (whereas 'match' is mostly entirely sports, if you include chess as a sport).
    – Mitch
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 14:23
  • @Mitch- yeah I’ve never heard that usage either. It sounds like schedule to me.
    – Jim
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 15:58
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    To address the question (if not answering it) - in the UK, fixture does commonly refer to a scheduled future match. However, it is also used to connect previous similar events. During play, a commentator might say "Arsenal haven't scored in this fixture since 2012" - meaning "against the same opposition, at the same venue". The phrase "Walcott has been poor in this match" does not mean the same thing as "Walcott has been poor in this fixture."
    – JHCL
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 16:20
  • @Rathony That site is based in Malta, and can be expected to use BrEnglish, but fixture is not used in this sense in US English. The text appears on the page as NBA 2015/2016 Schedule, NBA 2015/2016 Fixtures, Upcoming Matches which is clearly keyword stuffing (as matches isn't used for NBA basketball games, either). Compare NBA.com results for schedule vs. NBA.com results for fixture.
    – choster
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 3:19

1 Answer 1

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They are synonyms but not perfect synonyms. In other words the meanings overlap. Which should be used is determined by context.


In the US, a fixture is a date rather than a match.

fixture
a settled date or time especially for a sporting or festive event; also : such an event especially as a regularly scheduled affair
Merriam-Webster

However your question uses the british english tag so:

In Britain it would be possible to say that team X played a number of fixtures.

fixture
2. BRITISH a sporting event arranged to take place on a particular date. "the team's last away fixture of the season"
Oxford Dictionaries

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    I have never heard the term fixture used in this sense in American English. Not in any newspaper, magazine, website, or on any broadcast.
    – Robusto
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 13:07
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    "Fixture" is used in court tennis in the U.S. to mean a tournament that is played every year -- e.g., the Anne Boleyn, a handicap tournament for women players, first prize a miniature steel axe. (Should be a sword, of course.) (court tennis is jeu de paume in France, real tennis in the UK and Australia). It is played mainly by Anglophiles.
    – ab2
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 13:30
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    The link may show it, but my experience does not. And my experience in American sports is pretty robust.
    – Robusto
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 13:53
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    @Rathony: Sky is a venue for British sports. I rest my case.
    – Robusto
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 16:20
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    What they choose to cover is not the issue. The issue is the audience they cover it for.
    – Robusto
    Commented Oct 31, 2015 at 16:42

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