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Is the following sentence grammatically correct?

This is the man, who I told you about, raised 6 million dollar to our company.

If it's ungrammatical, what makes it so?

closed as off-topic by anongoodnurse, JHCL, tchrist, Brian Hooper, choster Oct 29 '15 at 15:39

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  • Sorry, correction on "English native speaker". – yellowton Oct 27 '15 at 20:53
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    This is a more suitable place to ask this question. – Færd Oct 27 '15 at 21:03
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This is the man, who I told you about, raised 6 million dollar to our company.

Yes, a non-native English speaker might in fact word your sentence that way. Only after becoming more fluent in English might he or she then word the sentence as follows:

This is the man whom I told you about, who raised six million dollars for our company.

Whom is used in the sentence's first part because the objective case is needed, as in "I told you about him." (Him and whom are objective case pronouns).

Who is used in the second part of the sentence because the nominative case is needed, as in "He/she raised six million dollars." (He and she are nominative case pronouns.)

With less-formal wording, an English speaker could also say,

This is the man I told you about who raised six million dollars for our company.

Or,

This is the man I told you about. He raised six million dollars for our company.

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    The use of 'who' (or even 'that') rather than 'whom' here is largely accepted. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 27 '15 at 22:38
  • @EdwinAshworth: Looks as though (or is "looks like" accepted today?) I need to get a bit more up to date in my pronouncements. A thousand pardons, Sahib. Don – rhetorician Oct 27 '15 at 23:17
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    @EdwinAshworth: 'that' I would agree with, but 'whom' is still used by those to whom clarity is important, partly to avoid repeating 'who' in constructions like OPs. – TimLymington Oct 28 '15 at 15:18
  • @TimLymington Are you saying that clarity isn't important to John Lawler? – Edwin Ashworth Oct 28 '15 at 17:22
  • @EdwinAshworth: I'm confused. How does John Lawler fit into this discussion? I'm just curious. Don – rhetorician Oct 28 '15 at 18:05

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