1

I think the best way to do this is using the examples below:

Considering it's going to be summer in Australia, you don't need to take that many clothes with you.

Is the sentence correct?

Because I think the one that considers it's going to be summer in AU is clearly "me (who says the sentence)", not "you" in the sentence.

So I am wondering if the subject should be "I" in this case, for example:

Considering it's going to be summer in Australia, I think you don't need to take that many clothes with you.

  • Logically, you've come up with a good argument. Really, 'Considering [that] ...' is obviously implying 'I 've had the thought that since ...'. But it's read as 'I've had the thought that it's going to be summer in Australia ... consequently I think ... / you don't .... The 'consequently' may refer either to the 'I've had the thought' or the 'it's going to be summer'. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 26 '15 at 16:50
1

Considering "itself" is a preposition and a conjunction as defined:

preposition& conjunction

Taking into consideration: [as preposition]: ‘considering the circumstances, Simon was remarkably phlegmatic’ [as conjunction]: ‘considering that he was the youngest on the field he played well’

[Oxford Online Dictionary]

Therefore, you don't have to worry about the subject of the independent clause.

| improve this answer | |
  • @BananaOnTheWall Glad I could help you. – user140086 Oct 27 '15 at 14:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.