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Travis , Tammy , and Shane, from Composition 115, spring semester , were sitting together on a leather bench in the sleekly lit lobby of my apartment building. The three of them had attended the same one-room schoolhouse, and they constituted the majority of their graduating class . Shane was holding a big carton that said " Xerox Paper " on the side. From deep within the box came a murmurous grunting and a sharp , rhythmic pulsing, as if it contained an internal organ . Everyone walking through the lobby looked at the box.

Tammy wore her hair in a high, stiffly sprayed froth of curls . She pushed back some strands and said, " Miss Diana, we just wanted to thank you for how much you've helped us with our thesis statements this year, and correct speech and whatnot, and Travis and Shane thought of this sweet little gift. "

The sentences stated above have been chosen from the following link:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/2004/07/11/the-goddess-of-flowers/f0ca69bf-fb03-47e2-bd6a-460073fbdf52/

1) I think by " you've helped us with our thesis statements this year, and correct speech and whatnot, and Travis and Shane thought of this sweet little gift." it is meant that she (Miss Diana) helped her students (Travis, Tammy and Shane) by correcting the wrong sentences written in their thesis statement. Am I right? If it is, the writer should write "corrected speech" (You have corrected speech) instead of "correct speech". So please tell me, why it is not written.

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    No, it would have to be "corrected our speech" if they wanted to use the past participle. The teacher has helped them "with their thesis statements and (with) correct speech," that is, she helped them to speak correctly. – Peter Shor Oct 26 '15 at 12:17
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Correct here is not the verb but the adjective; it modifies speech, and this NP is one of three objects of the preposition with:

 ... you've helped us      with     our thesis statements ... 
                          [with]    correct speech  
                      and [with]    whatnot

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