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Is there a single word or expression for all the tests/checks done before doing the actual task? The context is to describe the tests that are performed to check the safety and other operational issues of the system before the actual testing.

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    Alpha and/or Beta-testing. – Joe Dark Oct 26 '15 at 9:36
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"Pilot or Pilot Test" could be a candidate. Pilot means:

Something serving as a test or trial.

[Wiktionary]

Pilot test, pilot study, pilot project, pilot experiment are used broadly.

A test name could differ depending on each industry, and alpha/beta tests are also braodly used in many industries such as gaming industry as Joe Dark suggested in the comment. All of them could be called a "preliminary" test.

something that comes first in order to prepare for or introduce the main part of something else.

[Merriam-Webster]

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  • Preliminary seems to be closest to what I am looking for. The idea was to find an expression that describes the tests to be done on all components around the main product but not the product itself. – Vivas Oct 26 '15 at 10:17
  • @Vivas Yes, indeed. All other names could be called "preliminary tests". – user140086 Oct 26 '15 at 10:20
  • Typo "braodly", can't fix – Nemo Nov 15 '15 at 10:24
  • @Nemo Thanks for your comment. I cannot fix it, either. Strange. – user140086 Nov 15 '15 at 10:27
  • Yes you can, you did! – Nemo Nov 15 '15 at 10:28
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Consider smoke testing or smoke test:

Smoke testing is non-exhaustive software testing, ascertaining that the most crucial functions of a program work, but not bothering with finer details.

(http://searchwindevelopment.techtarget.com/definition/smoke-testing)

Another word would be sanity testing or confidence testing (source).

This may be industry-dependent, but that's what we call basic daily sanity tests in the software/tech field. More in-depth testing is typically required later on.

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