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Below is a GMAT sentence correction question, regarding the proper usage of "include".

\begin{question}

As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, [Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater, who trained several generations of actors including] Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro.

(A) Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater, who trained several generations of actors including

(B) Stella Adler, one of the most influential artists in the American theater, trained several generations of actors who include

(C) Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater, training several generations of actors whose ranks included

(D) one of the most influential artists in the American theater was Stella Adler, who trained several generations of actors including

(E) one of the most influential artists in the American theater, Stella Adler, trained several generations of actors whose ranks included

\end{question}

The correct answer is (C). However I see (A) as equally competent. The reasoning behind the choice between (A) and (C), according to this link, is that "including" in (A) is supposed to modify "generations" as opposed to "actors", whereas "whose ranks" in (C) more unambiguously modifies "actors". While I agree that (C) has less semantic ambiguity because "whose" typically refers to people, is (A) correct by itself?

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    None of those is going to win any awards. – Hot Licks Oct 25 '15 at 19:43
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I don't think (A) is valid. It places "who trained" after "theater", but "who trained" refers to the subject, Stella Adler, not "theater".

The clause starting with "who trained" (the modifier) must be placed immediately after the noun/pronoun it modifies.

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(A) Stella Adler was [one of the most influential artists in the American theater], who trained several generations of actors including

The bracketed part is a noun phrase made of many modifiers. Who... part simply modifies this big noun phrase, and it sounds clumsy because of the distance between the relative clause "who..." and what it is supposed to be modifying, "one" (note that one of the most influential artists is the head of the noun phrase and how far it is from the relative clause due to the presence of adjective prepositional clause, in the American theater).

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