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I am looking for an expression or term that would describe the relationship between the two mothers of their married children.

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There's a specific term for the relationship between people whose children marry each other: co-parents-in-law.

The relationship between people whose children marry each other: the parents of the bride vis-à-vis the parents of the groom.

(Wiktionary)

The Wiktionary entry additionally includes usage notes stating that in normal conversation the generic "in-laws" may be used, although this could be ambiguous.

To avoid ambiguity in everyday speech you can rely on context, or use phrases such as "my son-in-law's mother" or "my daughter-in-law's mother".

Wiktionary also lists coordinate terms such as:

  1. co-mother-in-law
  2. co-father-in-law

Co-mothers-in-law specifically answers your question:

The relationship between women whose children marry each other; the mother of the bride vis-à-vis the mother of the groom.

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In the Spanish language this word exists. It is Consuegros. Sadly, there is no equivalent in the English language to describe the relation of the in-laws to each other. Perhaps a version of this, "Co-mothers-in-law." Example, "Now that our children have married each other, I suppose that makes Marie my co-mother-in-law."

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My son is getting married in six weeks and my future DIL's mother and I are becoming good friends. We liked sister-Moms but decided on co-moms

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    While you can of course refer to yourselves however you like, can you demonstrate that this term is used by anyone anywhere else? The questioner seems to be looking for an existing term, not suggestions for new ones. – choster May 26 '16 at 15:45

protected by user140086 May 26 '16 at 15:34

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