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I was wondering if it was the correct way to use 'Particular'. Correct me if I am wrong.

"it is good for us to focus on basic things in particular before we go in deep."

  • I suggest you get rid of “in particular” altogether. – Jim Oct 18 '15 at 1:36
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    “in particular” is used to call out some important subset of a larger set. We should focus on the basics first- in particular the commutative property of addition... – Jim Oct 18 '15 at 1:39
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Alas, this isn't a question of grammar.

It is good for us to focus on basic things in particular before we go in deep.

It's just awkward. Don't fix it: rewrite it. There are several ways to express the same sentiment. Here are a few:

  1. Basics before details.
  2. Let's cover the basics before going into details.
  3. It would be beneficial to everyone if we focused on the basics before delving into all kinds of particulars.
  4. Let's go over the basics first.

And so forth. Aim for brevity: long-winded, wordy speeches make audiences wish they were playing poker instead of listening to you, and that's never a good thing. You want your audience to adore you and be your bosom friend and staunch supporter.

Depending on the situation, "It is good for us" may even sound a bit rude. People should be free to decide what is good for them and what isn't. When that freedom is questioned, they tend to get resentful. The rule of thumb is go with "would be" instead of "is" - the illusion of courtesy created by the ambiguity always goes down well ("Would it be good for us? Probably. I don't know. You decide. Don't kill me, I'm just trying to do my job here.")

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