4

Are both versions gramatically correct?:

"The opposition between good and evil no longer exists."

"The opposition between good and evil does no longer exist."

9

Yes, these are both correct, and have the same meaning. However, your second example doesn’t sound very natural; normally, we use do in English to show emphasis, in the affirmative:

— Does the opposition between good and evil exist any longer?

— It does still exist!

If you want to add emphasis to “no longer”, you can phrase it negatively, with “any longer”.

The opposition between good and evil doesn’t exist any longer.

6

The opposition between good and evil no longer exists. [normal]

The above is the normal way of saying it.

The opposition between good and evil does no longer exist. [unidiomatic]

Strictly speaking the above is grammatically possible but no-one would ever say it.

The opposition between good and evil exists no longer. [dramatic]

That sounds overdramatic as though you are making a speech.

If you want to use 'to do' then you should say:

The opposition between good and evil does not exist any longer. [emphatic]

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