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I know that "among others" is used when we mention one or more than one person. But still, I am a little confused.

For example: "Among others, Adam and Smith supported me at the meeting."

(I am quoting this sentence from this link in the same site https://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/37772/the-usage-of-among-others")

Does this mean that Adam and Smith are the only ones who supported me at the meeting? Or does this mean that Adam and Smith along with other people that I don't want to mention supported me at the meeting?

Hope is not a dumb question, Thank you!

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Great question!

Does this mean that Adam and Smith are the only ones who supported me at the meeting? Or does this mean that Adam and Smith along with other people that I don't want to mention supported me at the meeting?

It means that there were other people. Adam and Smith were in the group who helped.

However you have pinpointed a complete lack of logic in the saying. I've used it all my life without realising that it makes no sense!

Adam, Smith and others helped so how can Adam and Smith be among the others? Impossible.

If we use logic then we should, and can, say, "Adam, Smith and others supported me."

  • You can go back to using the locution without worry. It means "Adam and Smith supported me and they stood among others who also supported me." – deadrat Oct 15 '15 at 19:57
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The latter is correct. ("Adam and Smith along with other people that I don't want to mention supported me at the meeting.")

Among others is used to indicate that there are several more people like the one or ones mentioned, but that you do not intend to mention them all.

http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/among-others

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