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I saw this sentence online and it has been bothering me:

"Tomorrow is me and my girlfriend's anniversary."

I immediately had an aversion to this sentence after reading it but then I quickly had an aversion to my own corrections in my head:

"My girlfriend's and my anniversary is tomorrow."

"The anniversary of my girlfriend and me is tomorrow."

The original author's sentence plus my two corrections all "sound" incorrect despite one having a better chance at being grammatically correct.

The original author I think confused the adverb "Tomorrow" as being the subject since he or she (I don't want to assume the author is heterosexual) chose to begin the sentence with it. However, in my estimation the subject of a sentence will remain so no matter where it's placed within the sentence; thus, "tomorrow" cannot be the subject but rather "anniversary" is which led me to use the options I listed above. Which of these "corrections" is correct and why? Both? Neither?

Thank You

Edit: Thank you all for the replies. Basically, I'm having a crisis of what sounds good to the ear and is standard versus what can sound incorrect/complex/clumsy to the ear but still be viewed as grammatically viable. Yes, adding a verb to describe what the couple would do on their anniversary and/or replacing "me and my girlfriend" with a standard possessive adjective "our" would easily solve the issue. But I guess my question was more about how irritatingly close can a speaker get to "bad grammar" or "broken English" without it being so? That's why I tried to use the OA's words at my disposal.

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, Barmar, Drew, tchrist, Chenmunka Oct 15 '15 at 13:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • "My anniversary with my girlfriend is tomorrow." Neatly side-stepping the problem altogether! :D – Holly Oct 14 '15 at 19:02
  • Tomorrow, my girlfriend and I will celebrate our anniversary, tweaks the original a bit. But you often have to do that to produce elegance of expression. or you could simply say ...tomorrow my girlfriend and I have our anniversary, or tomorrow is the anniversary of my girlfriend and me. – WS2 Oct 14 '15 at 22:22
  • Thank you all for the replies. Basically, I'm having a crisis of what sounds good to the ear and is standard versus what can sound incorrect/complex/clumsy to the ear but still be viewed as grammatically viable. Yes, adding a verb to describe what the couple would do on their anniversary and/or replacing "me and my girlfriend" with a standard possessive adjective "our" would easily solve the issue. But I guess my question was more about how irritatingly close can a speaker get to "bad grammar" or "broken English" without it being so? That's why I tried to use the OA's words at my disposal. – Leonard Shelby Oct 15 '15 at 1:28
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Tomorrow is my birthday.

Tomorrow is my girlfriend's birthday.

Tomorrow is my birthday and my girlfriend's birthday.

Hence: Tomorrow is my and my girlfriend's birthday.

You would surely not think of writing "Tomorrow is me birthday", so why do it in a more complicated construction?

  • Thank you for your reply. As I stated in my other reply above, my question had to deal more with grammatically viable options no matter how clumsy their arrangement. Following your examples, would "Tomorrow is the birthday of myself" still be grammatically viable? – Leonard Shelby Oct 15 '15 at 1:49
  • I believe that "myself" is a reflexive pronoun that is often used to add emphasis to the main noun. For example "They vote republican but I myself vote democrat". – Anton Oct 16 '15 at 6:53
  • I believe that "myself" is a reflexive pronoun that is often used to add emphasis to the main noun. For example "They vote republican but I myself vote democrat". From that point of view, the answer to your question is no. However, "Myself" has crept into use as a pronoun when used by pretentious people - often in business and who wish to impress with spurious formality - who write pompous things like "Please refer to myself for permission." I find such constructs awkward and illiterate, but that is language for you! – Anton Oct 16 '15 at 7:01

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