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I need to report about the tasks I've done related to fixing bugs and errors in software development. So how to express the task that I fixed a software bug?

Some use bug fixes but many also prefer to use fix bugs. In particular, these words are used in commit messages. Which are commonly used and correct in the world of software development?

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Here's the difference:

Bug fix: Here fix means something that solves a problem, i. e. corrects a bug. For example, a patch can result in a bug fix.

Bug fixes: The plural form of the above.

Bug fixing: The activity of correcting software defects. Example: We've done a lot of bug fixing recently.

(To) fix a bug: Fix is a verb here, denoting the action of correcting a software defect.

bugfix: (computing) A patch or change that fixes unwanted behaviour due to a bug.

If it's a report you're writing, you can simply start with "The following bugs have been successfully fixed:", and then add a bulleted list.

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It can be expressed exactly as you mentioned with a small addition:

I encountered a variety of bugs in the software and proceeded to identify and correct them.

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  • Fix and correct are synonyms, all this does is add words to the sentence without adding any detail. – Chris H Oct 14 '15 at 7:30
  • @ChrisH in technical terminology, as in software programming, they aren't always the same. – Mamta D Oct 14 '15 at 7:33
  • I've never (in a software sense) encountered a difference -- could you explain it? I can (of course) think of cases where they're not synonyms, but not when paired with "bug" or in a software sense. – Chris H Oct 14 '15 at 9:13
  • Fixing bugs can include identifying bugs and placing them in a ticket system from where they are later picked up and corrected one by one based on priority. So the fixing alone doesn't mean correction but you will fix and correct – Mamta D Oct 14 '15 at 9:32
  • When I write code it's not in a formalised system, but I've never come across "fix" meaning "find but don't fix", in real life or in reading. "Log" or "find" would seem more appropriate in this case. – Chris H Oct 14 '15 at 10:48

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