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Apprentices, sorta like trainees who are skilled but need a bit of training and experience before making the commitment to employ them.

When I did a bit of research, I observe that "apprentices" were more commonly employed in the UK.

I am trying to be global, so I do not want to refer to a term that is more commonly understood in one region.

The message i am trying to come up with a slogan to encourage companies, mainly startups and small-business to hire "apprentices", but I am not sure how to communicate that in a global term.

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    According to Ngram, apprentice is both common in BrE and AmE : books.google.com/ngrams/…. Apprentices : books.google.com/ngrams/… – user66974 Oct 13 '15 at 20:24
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    thanks for your comment, but when you search apprentices the first references are from uk. europe tend to embrance apprentices more than north american. this why i am wondering of a different way to express it – jon220 Oct 13 '15 at 20:25
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    'sorta' might be okay on social media but it looks out of place on a language site. Certainly never use it in even semi-formal English. Even 'sort of' is informal. – chasly from UK Oct 13 '15 at 20:43
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    @josh - It's just a comment on the OP's first sentence. Non-native speakers often aren't aware of which abbreviations are or aren't acceptable in general English, e.g. The abbreviations, "don't" and "can't" are fine but contractions like "sorta" aren't, even though you come across them in song lyrics and on social media. – chasly from UK Oct 13 '15 at 20:59
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    I hadn't noticed that, good point. – user66974 Oct 13 '15 at 21:02
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In the US, a number of trades have apprentice, journeyman, and master levels, so there is the possibility that you would be misunderstood. What you might suggest is that they offer internships and hire interns.

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    thanks for the suggestion, but apprentice aren't usually more qualified than interns? I do not want to come accross as a place where company find untrained or unskilled workers looking to get their feet wet, but already qualified worker who just need a bit of polishing and get more exposure of your company culture. At the same time for the candidate, generally all apprentice are paid, while interns especially nowadays can go unpaid, or underpaid which could be a turn off for many – jon220 Oct 13 '15 at 22:17
  • There are paid interns. Apprentices here, those in the trades, don't need "a bit of polishing". Apprenticeships can last seven years. You can use the word apprentice as you like, of course, but just be aware that it has more than one meaning. – TRomano Oct 14 '15 at 1:36

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