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I'm Sorry

What is a word that means the same thing as "sorry", except without the meaning of apology. The image above illustrates what I mean.

Edit: Although the answers below are fine, I would like it to function in a sentence similar to "sorry". Indeed, it would be best if it could be directly substituted for the word "sorry" in a sentence. (Especially good if it's a single word.)

  • Related (not a duplicate): english.stackexchange.com/questions/19334/… – Marthaª Oct 9 '15 at 22:27
  • The image clearly illustrates that the answer is sorry; unless what you meant to ask for was a phrasing that doesn't also possibly have the apologetic meaning. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Oct 9 '15 at 22:43
  • @JanusBahsJacquet The image is being ironic. – PyRulez Oct 9 '15 at 22:44
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    @PyRulez Yes, exactly. The image is a peeve at people who interpret “sorry” as being an apology when it clearly is not. In other words, sorry is a word that means the same as ‘sorry’ in the non-apologetic sense. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Oct 9 '15 at 22:49
2

That's too bad, or, shortened to too bad.

The idea is that the situation is bad, but no blame for it is implied:

Too bad is used to express sympathy at another's misfortune. (WT)

It can be used ironically, but if said with a sympathetic tone, its meaning is clear.

1

To express sympathy, you can use "It's a shame". Meaning it's regrettable or unfortunate.

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To eliminate the apologetic connotation of sorry, you may feel sorry or you may [deeply] sympathize [with someone].

Example: I want you to know that I understand the way you feel and sympathize with your concern for your child and your grandchildren.

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I [really] feel for you.

feel for someone: to feel the emotional pain that someone else is feeling; to empathize or sympathize with someone. I really feel for you. I'm so sorry it turned out this way. Fred felt for Dave, but there was nothing he could do for him.

(McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs)

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