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I am struggling with this sentence:

Each year more than a thousand people, half of whom children, die in bicycle accidents.

Why can the verb 'to be' be omitted in this sentence?

closed as off-topic by Fattie, Mitch, tchrist, Tragicomic, FumbleFingers Oct 11 '15 at 17:40

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    I don't think a native speaker would omit are. – deadrat Oct 9 '15 at 10:36
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    It's a typo. It should be "half of whom are children". – Fattie Oct 9 '15 at 10:53
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    Or it could also be "half of them children". It's easy to get mixed up among pronouns in English. – John Lawler Oct 9 '15 at 18:55
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If you google "Participial Construction", there will be a lot of examples where being and having been are omitted. The reason is that they are predictable.

Each year more than a thousand people, half of whom are children, die in bicycle accidents.

This sentence can be rephrased to:

Each year more than a thousand people, and half of them are children, die in bicycle accidents.

and using Participial Construction, you can change it to:

Each year more than a thousand people, half of them (being) children, die in bicycle accidents.

If you want to use half of whom in place of half of them, are should not be moitted as whom is an object pronoun and the subject half needs the verb be.

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It is "are" which is omitted here. half of whom are children...

Such sentences are called elliptical constructions and they usually omit the words which are implied but not actually present.

https://www.aje.com/en/author-resources/articles/editing-tip-elliptical-constructions

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