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Which is correct and why?

a) The New York Times is a daily American newspaper founded on September 18, 1851, and is still getting published in New York City.

b) The New York Times is a daily American newspaper founded on September 18, 1851, and is still being published in New York City.

c) The New York Times is a daily American newspaper founded on September 18, 1851, and is still published in New York City.

closed as off-topic by Tragicomic, Mitch, Hellion, sumelic, anongoodnurse Oct 5 '15 at 0:34

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  • You need to specify why you think any of the three is right or wrong. For example, you think using "getting" is wrong because .... I think getting is better than being because .... Or why you find this obvious question difficult to understand. – user140086 Oct 3 '15 at 17:38
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    Stylistically, I don't like any of them. Too many words between the first is and the second. By the time I reached the conjunctive and I'd forgotten that the "deleted repeated subject" was The New York Times - I just remembered back to a daily American newspaper, so I expected the next clause to structurally mirror founded on September 18, 1851. The second is makes it a "garden path" sentence, but that can be fixed by simply deleting it! – FumbleFingers Oct 3 '15 at 18:31
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    I'd prefer two sentences, as I think that there are two statements far enough apart to warrant them. 'The New York Times is an American daily newspaper, founded on September 18, 1851. It is still published in New York City.' – Edwin Ashworth Oct 3 '15 at 21:02
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    None of them. The New York Times is a daily American newspaper founded on September 18, 1851, which is still being published in New York City. There's not enough parallelism between the two halves of the sentence to leave out the subject and join them with and. A simpler example with the same problem is: John is an explorer and is being chased by a lion. – Peter Shor Oct 4 '15 at 1:27
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    I support Peter Shor's answer , but I think that the last sentence contains parallelism . Founded and is still published , etc. If I'm wrong don't hesitate to prove otherwise please . – Omar Oct 4 '15 at 15:11
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b) is "most correct" AKA the stylistically optimal answer, as the focus of the sentence is on the act of the paper being published to this day, and in the same city. If you use c), you are focusing on the city being the most important aspect of the sentence (as being opposed to the newspaper now being published in Tampa Bay or St. Petersburg). Technically, both b) and c) are correct; use the one that has the appropriate focus for your usage.

a) is just altogether wrong, as the correct word to use with "published" is "being" (in this particular case anyway). "To get published" is the act of (finally) having a work put into print, and not the act of publishing something like a newspaper.

  • I'm with Peter Shor: none of them is without fault. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 4 '15 at 14:06

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