1

In my specific case, I'm writing a tutorial on how to format a list of items. Now I would usually say etc. , but in my mind you can only use etc. following a statement, rather than proceeding it.

So I would be happy to when addressing how "thing1", "thing2" and "thing3" should be formatted, say that the finished product should look like:

{
thing1
thing2
thing3
etc.
}

But to my mind, when addressing things 24-26,

{
etc.
thing24
thing25
thing26
etc.
}

doesn't seem right.

Is there a short latin word or other more formal convention that fills the gap I'm looking for? Rather than resorting to:

{
blah blah blah
thing24
thing25
thing26
etc.
}

Which isn't that professional.

Of course in many cases it's possible to get around this by just not giving such an example, but this is interesting to me as a general question as well as to solve a specific problem.

  • 2
    why not use the symbol for ellipsis . . . ? – bib Oct 1 '15 at 11:48
  • I will if I can't find a better alternative. It looks a bit ugly in the context I'm using it, and I'm wording if there's a word I can use – Some_Guy Oct 1 '15 at 11:49
  • Well you could use et alia (Latin for and others) or et al. in brackets, [et al.], but I don't recall having seen it used in this way. – bib Oct 1 '15 at 11:52
  • 1
    To clarify, are you looking for an equivalent to 'etc.' or 'and so on' which can be used before a list of examples? – JHCL Oct 1 '15 at 11:52
  • One can use something along the lines of "word word word [omitted text] word word word". The wording of "omitted text" can hint at the reason for omission. – Hot Licks Oct 1 '15 at 11:53
2

In mathematics there are ellipsis in all directions. EL&U doesn't appear to have latex typesetting but the codes are:

\dots \vdots \ddots

An example of \vdots:

enter image description here

0

As an alternative to elpisis, you might consider a brief explanation in square brackets.

If we highlight multiples of 56 we would see:

{
[The 54 previous items]
Item55
Item56*
Item57
[The subsequent items]
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.