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I have a multiple choice question that might have only one answer or all of the above might be correct. Since I'm teaching kids I want to avoid wordiness, below are my two attempts:

What is the difference or are the differences between a base 10 counting system and a base 16 counting system?

or...

What is/are the differences between a base 10 counting system and a base 16 counting system?

Does anyone have a better approach to this? I feel there must be!

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    FWIW, I think you can get away with "What is the difference..." because although there may be many differences, they could all be considered a piece of the whole difference between. So, a reply could look like, "The difference between A and B is that 1) A is... and B is not. 2) B has.... and A does not. Again this is based solely on opinion...
    – MegaMark
    Sep 29, 2015 at 18:21
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    There's no reason to try to reduce the amount of words you use for a multiple choice question. Don't use unnecessary words; but words used to make the question clearer are not unnecessary. You should use as many words as it takes to make it completely clear.
    – herisson
    Sep 29, 2015 at 19:27

2 Answers 2

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How is the Base 10 counting system different than Base 16?

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  • I'd say 'How does the Base 10 counting system differ from Base 16?', but this seems like the best method to me.
    – JHCL
    Sep 30, 2015 at 14:20
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Explain the difference(s) between a base 10 and a base 16 counting system.

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