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"Meet us on Summer Summit in New York and see why our innovative product is already considered the best-kept secret in the industry."

Is the and used correctly? Should I add a comma before it? Is the whole sentence correct this way?

closed as off-topic by Chenmunka, Hellion, Dan Bron, Sven Yargs, anongoodnurse Sep 28 '15 at 23:45

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  • And is just optional. – sooeithdk Sep 28 '15 at 15:19
  • Why would you want your product to be the best-kept secret in the industry? Shouldn't you be out promoting it, selling it, touting its capabilities, and generally raising awareness of it, rather than trying to make sure nobody knows about it? – Hellion Sep 28 '15 at 20:28
  • @Hellion: Maybe the company doesn't have to worry about promotion because the product is already universally recognized as the best-kept secret in the industry. – Sven Yargs Sep 28 '15 at 22:21
  • It might just be me (it often is) but I'm having trouble making sense of " already considered the best kept secret in the industry". Presumably the best kept secret would be the one which was secret for the longest time? Yet "already" implies a short time. Once people consider your secret... it is no longer secret. The "best kept secret" is surely that which is not yet known about? – Margana Sep 28 '15 at 22:21
  • Yes, this sentence is a bit paradox, but I am using it for a promotional video and I will have a pitch on this event, so until I get there everybody can think about it... :D – Infinite Possibilities Sep 29 '15 at 5:53
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If "Summer Summit" is an event that is organized on a regular basis, I recommend using the definite article, "the".

I would suggest using "in" instead of "on".

"and" is used correctly and it can be replaced with "to"

Actually "and" is used to replace "to", so you don't need to place a comma before it.

"Meet us in the (or this year's) Summer Summit in New York and (or to) see why our innovative product is already considered the best-kept secret in the industry."

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