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But what is surprising, and some would say discouraging, is that adding the statistical realities of the larger hunger problem to Rokia's story significantly reduced the contributions to Rokia.

The bold clause is inserted in the middle of a sentence.

What would be the full sentence of the inserted clause?

and some would say (what is) discouraging

and some would say (it is) discouraging

or anything else you can think of?

Thanks a lot.

  • Maybe it is a compound verb (surprising and discouraging), with a parenthetical modifier (some would say) of the second verb. In other words, maybe it should be punctuated thus ... surprising and, some would say, discouraging ... or thus ... surprising and (some would say) discouraging ... – phoog Sep 26 '15 at 6:07
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    @phoog, yes, except it's a compound adjective, as one can tell by the fact that "surprising" or "discouraging" could be modified by "very" (which doesn't modify verbs). – Greg Lee Sep 26 '15 at 12:24
  • You can make it a "full sentence" by simply removing the commas. – Hot Licks Sep 26 '15 at 12:43
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What you refer to as a bold clause is not a clause. It's part of a conjoined adjective: [Adj [Adj surprising ], and some would say [Adj discouraging ] ]. You're looking for a way to expand the "clause" in place, but there is no way to do that, since it's not a clause. You can expand the "and" construction so that it connects two clauses, however.

It's difficult to do this when the sentence is in pseudo-cleft form, so first, let's rephrase it:

That adding the statistical realities of the larger hunger problem to Rokia's story significantly reduced the contributions to Rokia is surprising, and some would say discouraging.

Now we can expand into a coordination of two clauses:

That adding the statistical realities of the larger hunger problem to Rokia's story significantly reduced the contributions to Rokia is surprising, and some would say that adding the statistical realities of the larger hunger problem to Rokia's story significantly reduced the contributions to Rokia is discouraging.

A more readable version pronominalizes the second "that"-clause:

That adding the statistical realities of the larger hunger problem to Rokia's story significantly reduced the contributions to Rokia is surprising, and some would say it is discouraging.

And finally, there is an economical way of expanding to a clause connected by "and", but it's kind of a trick:

But what is surprising, and some would say this is discouraging, is that adding the statistical realities of the larger hunger problem to Rokia's story significantly reduced the contributions to Rokia.

where "this" refers forward to the "that"-clause.

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