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I would like to know the idiom for ignoring something wrong because It is beneficial for one? Turn a blind eye is close, but It is not precisely about ignoring for benefit or gaining something. It is more like to keep neutral in the situation.

Or if there is a single word for it.

  • Might not be of use, but I can only think of 'ethical egoism' where you only act to benefit yourself, usually ignoring the problems of others... – Julia Sep 24 '15 at 7:20
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    Corporate policy? – JEL Sep 24 '15 at 7:31
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    Actually, "turn a blind eye" is exactly the thing to use. It means ignoring something because it is beneficial to do so -- usually because not ignoring something means more work. – Andrew Leach Sep 24 '15 at 7:31
  • @Julia Ethical egoism I think is the general term for this phenomenon. – Sofiko Sep 24 '15 at 9:33
  • @AndrewLeach Still I think It is not exactly what I search for. To make argument: "The usher turned a blind eye to the little boy who sneaked into the theater. How can you turn a blind eye to all those starving children?" This sentence shows frequent contextual usage of the idiom.It is more empathetic to the one to whom the eye was turned blind. I search for like allowing someone to do mistakes (when you can easily stop them to do so) by keeping silence,turn blind,deaf...because you will be in a gain,profit. May be benefit was not a right word to use there,which gave ground to the confusion. – Sofiko Sep 24 '15 at 9:48
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The closest idiom I can think of is 'ignorance is bliss'.

Ignorance is bliss is a proverb, meaning :

what you don't know won't hurt you.

An example in the context of your scenario would be:

Tom: I'm really curious what happened to the intern who embezzled the office's funds. He went into the boss' room and never came out since.

May: I wouldn't want to dig into his affairs if I were you; after all, ignorance is bliss.

  • When ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise. – WS2 Sep 24 '15 at 8:54
  • @WS2 I search for like allowing someone to do mistakes (when you can easily stop them to do so) by keeping silence,turn blind,deaf...because you will be in a gain,profit. May be benefit was not the right word to use there,which gave ground to the confusion. – Sofiko Sep 24 '15 at 9:55
  • Disagree. In the context of "ignorance is bliss", ignorance means "not knowing something" not "choosing to ignore what you know" ( [dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/ignorance-is-bliss Cambridge Dictionary]). The OP is asking about turning a blind eye to something for personal gain; that is "to ignore" not "ignorance". – Stephen Kennedy Sep 24 '15 at 14:16
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"selective blindness" usually refers to individually motivated ignorance to an event or phenomenon.

  • It's more close to what I search for,but I thought that there might be more descriptive idiom or collocation for that. – Sofiko Sep 25 '15 at 16:06
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Consider the idiom develop a tin ear in its most figurative sense, the one you use when you want to say that someone has fallen short or become oblivious of their promises, duty, or line of conduct in behalf of their own ends.

Public servants come to the capital full of pure intentions and then, it is said, fall into the orbit of special interests and develop a tin ear to the cries of constituents.

What's most troubling is that President Obama seems to have developed a tin ear about shadow money in politics.

Alternately, look the other way might fit here.

look the other way: (fig) to ignore something on purpose, especially something of an illicit nature.

E.g. The usher decided to look the other way when the little boy sneaked into the theater

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Although I’ve always interpreted it to mean “turning a blind eye” (which you are not looking for), perhaps the added notion of “evil” in the proverb "see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" would take it far enough beyond the neutrality (“empathy[y] to the one to whom the eye was turned blind”) that you (correctly, imo) detect in “turning a blind eye” and make it a bit closer to what you are seeking. (It also pretty literally addresses the “by keeping silence, turn blind, deaf” clarification you make in the comments)

(from Wikipedia)

If the “Three wise monkeys” and their proverb are still too neutral, perhaps the best way to fully capture the notion that you describe would require combining the idiomatic phrase, “willful ignorance” with the less-used “self-serving ignorance” to arrive at the accurately descriptive, yet rarely used (4 hits in books): “willful and self-serving ignorance.”

(links to Wikipedia;Google/books; & Google/search)

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