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For example, would the sentence "I hunger for success" differ from "I thirst for success"? Can hunger and thirst be used interchangeably when expressing desire, or is one more appropriate than the other and in what context?

  • To be literal and pedantic: You can live for a lot longer without food than without water. Therefore "I hunger for success" could mean you are willing to put In a longer period of work and waiting than if you said "I thirst for success." – ab2 Sep 22 '15 at 13:06
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As they are, I don't think one is more appropriate than the other. You'd have to determine that based on the context in which they are used. I would say that thirst invokes a sharper and more dire sense of desire and hunger a more forceful and consuming one. However, these would need to take cues from surrounding structure to have a significantly altered impact from just "I desired success."

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They are interchangeable as when used as a verb both mean "a strong desire for". Technically, you can even say you hunger for water and thirst for food.

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