2

Recently I have come across this strange sentence:

The paper was mainly about the everyday life of the ordinary people during the Japanese occupation so did not favour any student of History.

Can we omit the subject after the conjunction " so" when it is the same as that of the main clause? If we can, then what about other conjunctions like "as" (in the sense of "because"), "because", "since"?

I know the omission of subjects is common for conjunctions like "if", "when" and "as". But rarely do I see this happen to conjunctions showing casual relationships like "so" and "because".

  • This omission looks completely wrong, for whatever reason. Leaving out the subject while keeping the finite verb seems only possible with and and or. Do you have examples with if and because? – Cerberus May 28 '11 at 6:31
  • It's just an editing error. The person obviously has forgotten to proofread. – user30759 Nov 12 '12 at 5:46
4

As you say, it is a conjunction, and so may be used in this manner. However, it would cause some ambiguity, and difficulty of comprehension, therefore I would recommend adding an "and" to clear things up:

The paper was mainly about the everyday life of the ordinary people during the Japanese occupation, and so did not favour any student of History.

  • Right, it works if you add and. I strongly feel it doesn't work without and at all. – Cerberus May 28 '11 at 14:44
  • "so did not favour any student of History" omits the subject, does it grammatically correct? what kind of structure is that? – bsdshell Sep 17 '14 at 0:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.