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As the word reason is countable and one thing can have many reasons, I would imagine that saying "one of the reasons" is more logical than "part of the reason". However, many people (native and non-native speakers alike) tend to use the latter.

My questions are:

1- Is it correct to use "part of the reason"?

2- Is it correct to use "one of the reasons"?

3- If both are correct, is there any reason why "part of the reason" is more common?

Thanks

  • One of the reasons is a much more common expression: books.google.com/ngrams/… – user66974 Sep 19 '15 at 11:50
  • Both are used. The choice depends in part on whether the "reasons" are (in a vaguely conceptual way) "countable" or not. And, in part, it's simply an arbitrary choice on the part of the speaker. – Hot Licks Sep 19 '15 at 12:08
  • Thanks Josh61. I think this trend shows that "one of the reasons" is much more common in written texts. – Sayadi Sep 19 '15 at 13:14
  • Thanks Hot Licks. I guess I'll go with "one of the reasons" more often. – Sayadi Sep 19 '15 at 13:17
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1- Is it correct to use "part of the reason"?

Yes, because saying it like this suggests that this reason is only part of a whole reason. If it were the whole reason we could say something like "the only reason..."

2- Is it correct to use "one of the reasons"?

Yes, because saying it like this suggests that this reason is only 1 of many reasons. If it were the only reason we could say something like "the 1 and only reason..."

3- If both are correct, is there any reason why "part of the reason" is more common?

I don't think "part of the reason" is more common, but perhaps it is for you. The beauty of the English language is its diversity in using it.

  • Thanks Micheal. A quite comprehensive answer. And yes, having a choice usually leads to some nice diversity. – Sayadi Sep 19 '15 at 13:19
  • @MuhammedAlsayadi you're welcome, feel free to award the answer if it answered your question. – Michael Rader Sep 19 '15 at 21:03

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