16

What is the negative peak point called on a graph as below?

enter image description here

  • 6
    I think this isn't a suitable question for ELU. The word is troughs. – FumbleFingers Sep 17 '15 at 17:23
  • 1
    He used the word troughs, specifically, Definition 7 of that link. – VampDuc Sep 17 '15 at 17:24
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    @FumbleFingers the dip is a trough, but that describes the overall dip, rather than the lowest point. – Dan Sep 17 '15 at 19:09
  • While possibly not directly relevant to the pictured time series (so perhaps not directly an answer to the Q), in some circumstances (e.g if the graph is of a density, density estimate, histogram, stem&leaf plot, dotplot/stripchart, barchart with ordered categories, frequency polygon etc), antimode is a possible choice. For example, see the question here and a comment here. – Glen_b Sep 18 '15 at 0:13
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    @Dan: The question now is totally different to what is was yesterday (originally OP simply asked ELU to transcribe the relevant word from a video clip). – FumbleFingers Sep 19 '15 at 14:56
30

Mathematically speaking, it is called a global/absolute minimum. The smallest value in a set of minima.

enter image description here

  • 7
    This is the correct answer. There may be other ways to describe it, but in terms of mathematics, this is simply what it is. Also note as the graph indicates, if it's the bottom of a dip, but not the deepest dip, it is a local minimum. – Dan Sep 17 '15 at 19:08
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    Also note that the image is wrong on one count: it should say global minimum, not global minima (that would be the case if there were more than one of them there, but there isn't). – Janus Bahs Jacquet Sep 17 '15 at 21:57
  • I don't disagree, but I think the OP is asking for a "local minumum" since there is nothing in his/her graph that implies it must be the global minimum. – WetSavannaAnimal Sep 18 '15 at 8:47
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    On the graph "global minima" should be labelled "global minimum" because it is singular. – Ben Sep 18 '15 at 11:14
  • In terms of register, this is quite wrong. The dual term for "peak point" is not "absolute minimum", is it? "Trough", as suggested by FF, is much more to the point. – anemone Sep 18 '15 at 11:53
16

There are lots of commonly used words/phrases:

  • trough
  • valley
  • minimum
  • low point
  • dip
  • bottom
  • floor
  • anti-climax
5

In my experience, one typically speaks of "peaks" and "valleys".

The other terms mentioned in other answers are not incorrect, but they also are not parallel to the figurative geographic description of the high points as "peaks". Only "valleys" has this appeal.

1

It can also be called a (negative) peak in some contexts, such as spectroscopy, chromatography (which accounts for most of the hits for "negative peak" on google) and electronics (in peak-to-peak signal amplitudes, one of the peaks is positive, the other negative).

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