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I would like to express the following idea in a more fashionable and eloquent manner:

leave on a break of unknown duration / take a break... / leave on hiatus...

Use of the highest linguistic register, highest level of formality and even archaic style are blissfully accepted.

Please be at liberty to change any part of this sentence and note as well that the duration is unknown and may span great lengths.

This is not a break from school, but a discontinuation of a certain activity for some time, a sign or a message, for example, to note one's leave.

2 Answers 2

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You can "take a sabbatical".

A "sabbatical" is a rest from work, or a break, often lasting from two months to a year. This term is derived from the biblical Sabbath which serves an ancient human need to build periods of rest and rejuvenation into a lifetime. Traditionally you’ll find sabbaticals in academic careers, but they are not just for teachers anymore. Anyone can take a sabbatical and travel. A sabbatical is simply getting an extended leave from work to pursue a break.

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  • Thank you very much for the swift response. I would rather avoid religious connotations , moreover I do not like the word, but would be willing to consider it.
    – user138544
    Sep 13, 2015 at 11:52
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    Therr is no longer a religious connotation, despite the etymology. It is the standard, formal term, especially in academic environments. You could say "going on leave", but that term is used more often in context of a disability or taking care of a medical or family situation/ problem. The proper word for taking a planned leave, as a break (after working for some years at the same job) is, as Graffito said, sabbatical. Sep 13, 2015 at 11:55
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an indefinite leave of absence (see b) is a commonly used phrase. A quick google search will yield many results.

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