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In Russia we have special medical institutions, somewhere between psychiatric hospitals and boarding schools for adults. There are different departments for people with mental disorders and people with neurological disorders (like сerebral palsy or anything else). People live there to get treatment and help.

As I wrote it's a place for adults only and I have no idea about its English equivalent. What should I call it in English?

  • In general, you could use the word "institution" to describe something like this, if there's no real analogue ... – Fattie Sep 11 '15 at 12:43
  • To qualify the centre / institution / nursing or residential care home, you may add "for mentally disabled adults". – Graffito Sep 11 '15 at 13:19
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Vilmar suggested nursing home as an option, but these often tend to be for older patients. Residential care homes offer these supports to patients of all ages.

Residential care refers to long-term care given to adults or children who stay in a residential setting rather than in their own home or family home.

There are various residential care options available, depending on the needs of the individual. People with disabilities, mental health problems, learning difficulties, Alzheimers, dementia or who are frail aged are often cared for at home by paid or voluntary caregivers, such as family and friends, with additional support from home care agencies. However, if home-based care is not available or not appropriate for the individual, residential care may be required.

Wikipedia - Residential Care

Care homes, also known as adult family homes, board and care homes, residential care or personal care homes offer personalized service to small groups of adults. These residential homes provide lodging, meal services and assistance with daily living activities.

A Place for Mom - What are Residential Care Homes?

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I believe it is called a nursing home:

A nursing home is a place for people who don't need to be in a hospital but can't be cared for at home. Most nursing homes have nursing aides and skilled nurses on hand 24 hours a day.

Some nursing homes are set up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. There might be a nurses' station on each floor. Other nursing homes try to be more like home. They try to have a neighborhood feel. Often, they don't have a fixed day-to-day schedule, and kitchens might be open to residents. Staff members are encouraged to develop relationships with residents.

Some nursing homes have special care units for people with serious memory problems such as Alzheimer's disease. Some will let couples live together. Nursing homes are not only for the elderly, but for anyone who requires 24-hour care.

(U.S. National Library of Medicine)

  • In fact this one is quite similar to what I need, but it refers more to nurses and medicine. These places tends to be not only medical institutions, but places where people can leave and get support (not only medical). So "residential care homes" describes them more accurate. But thank you as well. – Maxim Sep 12 '15 at 11:26
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Another option would be an Assisted Living Facility:

The Assisted Living Federation of America defines assisted living as a long-term care option that combines housing, support services and health care, as needed. Assisted living is designed for individuals who require assistance with everyday activities such as meals, medication management or assistance, bathing, dressing and transportation. Some residents may have memory disorders including Alzheimer's, or they may need help with mobility, incontinence or other challenges.

(Assisted Living Federation of America website)

  • This term is also now in use in GB. Residents, often married couples, will have their own apartments, with central facilities such as for dining, and socialising, with laundry, maintenance, and cleaning staff on site, together with nursing care. – WS2 Sep 11 '15 at 23:36
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How about sanitarium, "an institution for the preservation or recovery of health, especially for convalescence; health resort."

  • This word is very dated. – WS2 Sep 11 '15 at 23:31

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