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The Bank entered into an agreement with X. The Bank entered an agreement with X.

I have always found 'entered into' being used but does the modern usage allow omission of 'into'?

  • I enter rooms all the time, and enter characters into text fields like this one. Is your issue with usage regarding agreements solely? – Robusto Sep 8 '15 at 11:05
  • As Chasly suggests, there is an ambiguity when "into" is omitted in the above context. If this document has any sort of legal importance it's probably best to avoid the ambiguity. – Hot Licks Sep 8 '15 at 12:31
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The Bank entered an agreement with X.

The problem with this in my opinion is that it encroaches on a different usage of 'to enter'.

7 to make report of (a ship or its cargo) to customs authorities

8 to place in proper form before a court of law or upon record (enter a writ)

9 : to go into or upon and take actual possession of (as land)

10 : to put formally on record (entering a complaint)

Merriam-Webster

Without context to the contrary I would naturally tend to think that 'the Bank entered an agreement with X' followed definitions 8 or 10.

However

It is clear from this Google ngram: enter into an agreement,enter an agreement that there is a gradual increase taking place in the usage you suggest - and indeed a reduction in the more traditional version.

  • I concur in this impeccable analysis. – Eric Hauenstein Oct 8 '15 at 15:07

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