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How would I indicate, for example, that I am going to use "toms" to mean "tomatoes". Something like:

Tomatoes (toms) are red. This is false as some toms are green. I like toms.

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I have often seen it in brackets, as in your example, with quotation marks and a capital:

Tomatoes ("Toms") are red. This is false, as some Toms are green. I like Toms.

I suppose the capital is not always necessary if the thing referred to isn't a name or a proper noun; however, it is easier to spot that this thing is special later if you use a capital throughout.

In legal texts, they use hereafter or hereinafter:

Tomatoes, hereafter called "Toms", are red. This is false, as some Toms are green. I like Toms.

But this is not recommended in academic writing. You could simply use in this paper and explain what you're going to do:

Tomatoes, which will be referred to as "Toms" in this paper, are red. This is false, as some Toms are green. I like Toms.

Tomatoes, which we will refer to as "Toms" in this paper, are red. This is false, as some Toms are green. I like Toms.

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  • What about "Tomatoes (hereinafter referred to as 'Toms') are red."? Oct 12, 2016 at 17:25
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    @ErikHumphrey: Sounds good to me! The only thing is that the word herinafter is widely considered very formal outside legal text; I don't think I've ever seen it in an academic article. Oct 12, 2016 at 17:28
  • @ErikHumphrey, I use hereafter "Toms"
    – Pacerier
    Feb 24, 2018 at 17:53
  • @Cerberus, Re "not recommended.."; Why not?
    – Pacerier
    Feb 24, 2018 at 17:53
  • @Pacerier: Well, I would say it is a bit too formal for (non-legal) academic writing? Maybe I can be proved wrong here. Feb 26, 2018 at 2:41

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