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This answer on a nearly identical question has some comments but no answers that seem to fully address this question, though I think this one comes close.

An example:

What if I make the menu for the week (or two weeks, since you shop for two weeks, right?)? Then you don't have to worry about it.

Or

What if I make the menu for the week (or two weeks, since you shop for two weeks, right)? Then you don't have to worry about it.

Or

What if I make the menu for the week (or two weeks, since you shop for two weeks, right?) Then you don't have to worry about it.

All of these seem pretty awkward. Is there any rule for this?

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The parenthetical is not part of the sentence; its punctuation does not impact the rest of your writing.

That being said, in my opinion, you should write your main thought as a single sentence:

What if I make the menu for the week and then you don't have to worry about it?

And then add the parenthetical as its own sentence:

What if I make the menu for the week (Or two weeks, since you shop for two weeks, right?) and then you don't have to worry about it?

This makes the aside stand out a little more and I think gives it a clearer tone. If that makes any sense.

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I think this may be a matter of opinion. I'll give mine anyway.

What if I make the menu for the week? Or two weeks, since you shop for two weeks, right? Then you don't have to worry about it.

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