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I don't know what to choose, that's why I am here to ask this question.

I have been paying this amount since November 2013 until/till now.

marked as duplicate by tchrist, Edwin Ashworth, Drew, FumbleFingers, Mitch Sep 5 '15 at 16:48

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There seems to be some disagreement in comments so I'll answer.

I have been paying this amount since November 2013 until now.

This is correct. You can say:

I have been paying this amount since November.

You can say

I have been paying this amount until now.

There is no conflict of tense. Both of the above sentences are valid. There is no reason they shouldn't be combined. This can be seen by adding 'and'.

I have been paying this amount since November 2013 and [I have been paying this amount] until now.

Here's a simpler sentence: I have been paying since then [and] until now.

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In saying, "I have been paying this amount since November," you are effectively implying that you are still doing so because you are writing this in the present and have not indicated that you have stopped paying the amount; I do not therefore think you need to say either "until" or "till" now. However, online dictionaries suggest that "till" is merely a more informal version of "until" so I suppose "until" would be preferred for a formal letter.

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I understood that you would like to know how to choose between till and until.

They're generally interchangeable, but until can make things clearer, just as "yes" can be clearer than "yeah".

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