-1

I have two sentences:

  1. The Solvay conference, after a century of the first one, brought all the physics geniuses together once again.

  2. The Solvay conference, after a century from the first one, brought all the physics geniuses together once again.

Which one would be the correct one (preposition of or from)? Or do I need to write something else?

closed as off-topic by anongoodnurse, Chenmunka, FumbleFingers, tchrist, Marv Mills Sep 9 '15 at 11:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." – anongoodnurse, Chenmunka, Marv Mills
  • "Please include the research you've done, or consider if your question suits our English Language Learners site better. Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic." – FumbleFingers, tchrist
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Neither. Use a century after the first one as the parenthetical phrase. – Andrew Leach Aug 28 '15 at 9:35
  • @AndrewLeach Beg, why? – Kris Aug 28 '15 at 10:33
  • The prep. of is natural with after -- think of it, after doesn't go with from. IOW, you don't need after in case of using from: "The Solvay conference, a century from the first one, brought all the physics geniuses together once again." HTH. – Kris Aug 28 '15 at 10:36
  • @AndrewLeach,@Kris Thanks a lot. So here century works like an adverb (Cf. tomorrow). I was treating it as a noun. Does ... a century later the first one .. work? Or what about .. after a century passed the first one ... ? – hbaromega Aug 28 '15 at 12:02
  • century of means that something was continuously happening for a century, e.g. after a century of war, they finally surrendered. – Barmar Aug 29 '15 at 0:59
1

This is clearer: "The recent Solvay Conference, held a century after the first, once again brought together all the physics geniuses."

You might want to say "the world's physics geniuses."

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.