1

Is there a single word for ready again ? Could it be re-ready?

Example:

I have multiple statuses: - not ready - ready - error - re-ready?

Example: First document is unsigned, then signed, after some manipulation it gets ready status. But if something happens to it after being ready( some error) it gets manipulated in some way and must inform user that document has gone through all that signing process and already had status ready, but then some error happened and is now "ready again"

  • What's the difference between "ready" status and "re-ready" status? Does your user distinguish between being ready the first time and being ready again? – deadrat Aug 28 '15 at 10:33
  • Yes, that would be the case. – n32303 Aug 28 '15 at 10:38
  • What is the document "ready" for, exactly? It's always "ready" for something, right? If there's room, it might be a good idea to make your status codes a little longer, maybe something like "ready for [whatever]" or "ready (modified)". – Doug Warren Aug 28 '15 at 13:36
1

It is newly ready.

However, I support the proposals to replace ready. (Although I realize this may be beyond your control.)

1

I think reset fits well here.

to move (something) back to an original place or position

'After performing the evasion maneuver he reset into his fighting stance.'

  • Well, it is not like that. It is not objects original place to be ready. First document is, unsigned, then signed, after some manipulation it gets ready status. But if something happens to it after being ready( some error) it gets manipulated in some way and must inform user that document has gone through all that signing process and already had status ready, but then some error happened and is now "ready again" – n32303 Aug 28 '15 at 12:29
  • @NejcLovrencic Hmm I see in that case reset may not be the best option. That being said I would highly encourage you to add the information in your comment to your OP I think it will help others provide better answers. – landocalrissian Aug 28 '15 at 12:45
  • 1
    +1 - Reset was what first came to my mind, too. (even with Nejc's clarification I like the connection with: “Ready … Set … [Reset]… GO!”) Maybe just “Set” would work (since it comes after ‘ready’ and before “Go” in the starter’s command), or if 2-words are permitted, maybe “All Set,” which can mean “finally/completely ready,” which perhaps is what Nejc means by “Re-ready.” (Anyway, as far as I'm concerned, you have the rights to all answers derived from your "reset," so please feel free to use/expound upon anything I've just said if/as you see fit.) – Papa Poule Aug 28 '15 at 14:48
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In this context, perhaps you can use restored or recovered. So you may have the states: not ready - ready - error - recovered.

  • Along the same lines: remedied, rectified, repaired. – jxh Aug 28 '15 at 19:44
0

I suggest to change ready status to prepare(d). In this fashion, your statuses will be - not prepared - prepared- error - reprepared.

Prepare:

  • to put in proper condition or readiness

E.g.

A prepared statement has to be reprepared after a DDL operation.

0

Have you considered changing ready with a different term?

uncompleted—completed—error—incomplete—recompleted

  • uncompleted: not completed.
  • completed: Having all the necessary or appropriate parts
  • error
  • incomplete: Not full or finished
  • recompleted: To complete again

Oxford Dictionaries

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If your document were a webpage then describing it as having been reloaded or refreshed could imply that it is the “latest updated version” containing its “most recent changes” (including the rectification of previous errors) and that it is ready for further viewing and/or action. (from The Free Dictionary)

0

I think reapproved or re-approved is the most appropriate term if what you are trying to convey is that it has been through the approval process more than once.

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