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For example:

  1. More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams. Perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition.

  2. More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams. This is perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition.

Is number one a normal usage in English, and is it preferred to number two? The reason for asking is because this sounds very odd to me and it’s not something I've come across often.

For example, I have come across the use of perhaps more often in the middle of sentences rather than at the beginning. Hence the reason for this question: are there any rules regarding the use of perhaps at the beginning of a sentence?

  • Please specify your reason for thinking it is not normal. (If you do not have a reason, then you don't have a question.) – RegDwigнt Aug 27 '15 at 10:25
  • I've edited my question-mind you, this is my first question on this site. – John_dydx Aug 27 '15 at 10:28
  • You didn't just omit the verb, you omitted the subject and the verb. You could say, "Perhaps this is a result of...," but you really need "this is" in there. – VampDuc Aug 27 '15 at 14:24
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    It's a sentence fragment, with conversational deletion. In the UK, GCSE grades are down this year. Perhaps as a result of unwise style choices in writing. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 27 '15 at 14:32
  • @EdwinAshworth, thanks for pointing that out, quite useful to know. – John_dydx Aug 27 '15 at 14:47
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I'd probably write the sentence as either 3 or 4:

  1. More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams - perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition. or
  2. More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams as a result of, perhaps, sheer hard work and competition.

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