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Imagine a scenario where the default value for a temperature is 20°C. Is there a word that you can use to say that if you do X you add 2°C to that value, if you do Y you minus 7°C to that value and if you do Z you add 1°C.

I want to explain that `for each action you apply a ...'

I can think of two words that are similar:

You could say you apply a handicap - as you would in golf

Or you apply a multiplier

The following question :What is a word similar to "multiplier" but for addition (or subtraction) suggests addend or subtrahend but again this implies a positive or negative direction.

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An adjustment:

  • A modification, fluctuation, or correction: an adjustment in the consumer price index.

(AHD)

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    I think a combination of your answer and Centaurus is best - an adjustment factor doesn't imply any particular method of changing a value or any direction but simply that it is changed. – PaulBarr Aug 26 '15 at 16:01
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I suggest you use "a correction factor" for the desired temperature.

For each action you apply a temperature correction factor.

  • A correction factor is any mathematical adjustment made to a calculation to account for deviations in either the sample or the method of measurement.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/facts_7268119_correction-factor_.html

Or, if your intention is not to correct an error, "a regulation" seems to fit.

  • For each action, you apply a temperature regulation.
  • I dont think correction factor is quite right as you are not trying to adjust a value to correct error but make an adjustment to one based off an action (yourdictionary.com/correction-factor) thank you for your help though, its closer that what I got to! – PaulBarr Aug 26 '15 at 15:29
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Modifier

From ODO:

a person or thing that makes partial or minor changes to something

This is a common usage for applying changes to the outcomes of die rolls in wargaming and RPGs.

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