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Aware that such a beast may not exist in the wild, I've painted myself into a corner in a naming scheme which now requires an antonym to hapax legomenon.

What is to be done?

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    Since hapax legomenon means "word used one time", perhaps something like Polla legomenon would suffice. ("word used many times", theoretically. You'd probably want to get a greek to translate properly.) – Hellion Aug 26 '15 at 14:52
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    Would this question be self-referential because its answer might well be a hapax legomenon itself? – oerkelens Aug 26 '15 at 14:57
  • A request for a possible neologism (in English, anyway) that stands in extreme opposition to a transliterated Greek term (ἅπαξ λεγόμενον) severely tests the boundaries of on-topicness at EL&U, in my opinion; it's not unlike seeking an antonym for eidos. The question presents an interesting puzzle, certainly, but the fact that comment-answerers have resorted to Greek in search of a suitable answer suggests that this is only marginally an English language question. (For a discussion of hapax legomenon, see this Wikipedia article on the subject.) – Sven Yargs Aug 26 '15 at 16:38
  • The odd thing about hapax legomenon is that, although even so narrowly inclusive a reference work as Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary accepts it as an English term in good standing, that same dictionary does not treat either hapax or legomenon as English language words. Thus hapax legomenon qualifies as English in a way similar to je ne sais quoi, which likewise has an entry in the Eleventh Collegiate, although none of its component words do. – Sven Yargs Aug 26 '15 at 16:59
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    @Hugh : If you're inclined to post polla legonema etc as an answer, I'll accept it. – Dan Sheppard Aug 27 '15 at 20:12
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Since hapax legomenon means "word used one time", and has related terms dis legomenon, tris legomenon, and tetrakis legomenon for a word used 2, 3, and 4 times, respectively, perhaps something like Polla legomenon or pollakis legomenon would suffice. (Polla = "many", so pollakis legomenon means "word used many times.")

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"Run-of-the-Mill" matches it for balance, somewhat.

"widely used" "generic" are workaday solutions.

Google's response to run-of-the-mill is "About 32,500,000 results (0.55 seconds) " which seems apt.

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    "Run-of-the-mill" only gets me about 3,480,000 results, so it's not as commonplace as "commonplace", which gets about 15,200,000 results. – FumbleFingers Aug 26 '15 at 15:00
  • @FumbleFingers More omnipresent definitely. – Hugh Aug 26 '15 at 15:03
  • In this context (which is the naming of a category, rather than prose) the contrast to hapax, which will always be nearby, is probably more important than common usage. I'm worried about coining daft jargon, but polla should be memorable. – Dan Sheppard Aug 26 '15 at 15:24
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    pollalegomena should mean many things said. When referring to people hoi polloi is a put down. ta polla -the majority of things- might work. Why not change languages and go for "Universalismus" ? I've no idea what it means but it is a real word. – Hugh Aug 26 '15 at 15:43

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