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The context here is a bank discussing a long-term project it's conducting. It has certain deadlines to adhere to, but it says that after the deadline has expired, they will need to do several rounds of XXX. The "XXX" refers to tasks that should have been done before, and need to be completed in order to complete the milestone.

This is a translation into English.

Any creative ideas? Thanks! Ilan

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The developers will issue several partial releases, beta releases or prereleases (which will only partially meet the specs, or specifications).

Then they will go through several rounds of updates, to remediate the deficiencies.

Remediation: act of correcting an error or a fault or an evil, http://www.synonyms.net/synonym/remediation

-- Edit -- New idea based on the clarifying comment about the testing.

The contractors will carry out several preliminary (or pre-deadline) rounds of commissioning. Subsequent to the official deadline, they will then carry out several rounds of final (or post-deadline) commissioning.

The Google definition of commission includes

Bring (something newly produced, such as a factory or machine) into working condition. We had a few hiccups getting the heating equipment commissioned.

This proposal is motivated by the commissioning I frequently hear my experimental physicist spouse talk about doing in the lab.

  • 1
    Perhaps "a round of supplementary releases" to indicate the provision of undelivered functionality, which differs from the correction of errors. As this appears to be a real-life situation, a warning, llanysong. Your usage choice may trigger a novation to your contract, so pass your wording by the legal department. – deadrat Aug 26 '15 at 18:53
  • @deadrat - I like supplementary releases. – aparente001 Aug 27 '15 at 4:52
  • Doesn't "supplementary" imply that these are extra, not part of the original group? The point I was trying to make is that this is more like finishing up tasks that should have been finished earlier. Also - no functionality here. This isn't about provision of software. It's about sessions in which software is supposed to be tested. There are a large number of items that need to be tested, and there is a chance that this won't occur by the deadline. This is why the *** round may be required. – Ilanysong Aug 27 '15 at 12:37
  • @Ilanysong - Please see edited Answer. Thanks for the additional info. – aparente001 Aug 29 '15 at 2:43
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The traditional term of mendacity is "several rounds of upgrades." This implies that the contractually-mandated functionality was completed by the deadline and that any changes constitute additions beyond the original specifications.

Likely this fools nobody.

  • Yes - but in this case, the opposite is the case. We aren't talking about extras that go beyond what was specified for the deadline. They are still completing tasks that should have been completed before. To call it "upgrade", IMHO, would be misleading... – Ilanysong Aug 26 '15 at 9:57
  • Of course it would. Hence the word "mendacity." To admit that they are still completing tasks that should have been completed (and for which they have already been paid) is to admit to breach of contract. You're not suggesting that the bank tell the truth, are you? – deadrat Aug 26 '15 at 10:03
  • Actually, I am. I'm working for the bank. The bank is the customer in this case, as it needs software developed for internal purposes, and the supplier is a third-party software developer. Nothing to be mendacious about here. I think you might be misunderstanding my context, so I'll explain. The bank basically says that it's conducting this project, in conjunction with the software developer, and that they have to abide by certain deadlines and complete certain tasks during those deadlines. – Ilanysong Aug 26 '15 at 10:18
  • However, it anticipates that certain tasks won't be completed due to lack of time. Therefore it proposes doing whatever can be done within the deadline, and afterwards, they'll schedule a "round of xxx" to deal with unfinished work. – Ilanysong Aug 26 '15 at 10:18
  • I'm sorry that I completely misunderstood the context. I thought the bank employees in charge of the project would be addressing regulators or customers instead of the contractor. I'm also sorry if I impugned your bank's integrity. It just never occurred to me that a bank would tell the truth, but then I'm from the US. I think aparente001's answer is on the right track. See my comment below it. – deadrat Aug 26 '15 at 18:47

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