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In the paragraph below, technology-related terms like DSRC and LTE are mentioned for the first time in the text. So they have to be given in the long form.

As a result, two levels of parentheses occur. Is it possible to avoid this and still ensure that the writing is correct?

With regard to these requirements, various wireless communication technologies have been considered for use in VANETs. Some of them being ad-hoc (e.g. WiFi, Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC)), and others infrastructure-based cellular technologies (e.g. Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS), Long Term Evolution (LTE)).

  • Drop the outer set of parentheses and place a comma where the dropped open parenthesis used to be. The abbreviation "e.g." should be followed by a comma. – deadrat Aug 25 '15 at 9:17
  • @deadrat I apologize, but I am not sure I understood what you mean. Should it look something like this: Some of them being ad-hoc, e.g., WiFi, Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC),.... – Kristof Tak Aug 25 '15 at 11:53
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The first set of parentheses you have used are not necessary. The use of "e.g." indicates a partial list and does not need to be set aside in additional parentheses.

If your style guide requires abbreviating acronyms immediately after their initial use then do so, otherwise wait until their subsequent usage.

The excerpt given could read:

"With regard to these requirements, various wireless communication technologies have been considered for use in VANETs. Some of them being ad-hoc e.g. WiFi, Dedicated Short Range Communications, Universal Mobile Telecommunications System and Long Term Evolution."

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    Looks good! Now just add a comma after ad-hoc. – aparente001 Aug 26 '15 at 1:52

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