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In sentences like this:

"The parenthetical phrase is a great example of using an interrupter to great effect for foming a clear idea."

Is it imperative to change it to this with double commas?

"The parethetical phrase is a great example of using an interrupter, to a great effect, for forming a clear idea."

The reason I am asking this is because I am not entirely sure if I can leave my sentence like this, since most of the people would write "The... interrupter for forming an idea to a great effect."

Please tell me if it is ok without double commas. Also, please provide me with parethetical phrases with double commas that start with word "to" if possible. Thank you.

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    There is not to the best of my knowledge a rule demanding that parentheticals be set off by at least commas. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 23 '15 at 18:24
  • What do you mean by at least? – hola Aug 23 '15 at 18:25
  • Parentheticals are usually set off by commas, parentheses or dashes. Different degrees of disjointedness / smoothness are achievable. This has been covered on ELU already. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 23 '15 at 18:33
  • I know it very well, but for some reason it seems like "to a great effect" is not parenthetical since it is not placed right after the subject, the very first word of sentence, and rather plays a key role in the sentence. – hola Aug 23 '15 at 18:36
  • And also if I put double commas, the idea kind of brakes and does not provide smoothness and if the double commas are not used it sounds like a run on sentence.. – hola Aug 23 '15 at 18:38
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"The parenthetical phrase is a great example of using an interrupter to great effect for forming a clear idea."

Please tell me if it is ok without double commas.

"To great effect" is not a parenthetical phrase here, and should not be set off by commas.

I've been trying to figure out why you get a run-on-sentence feel from this sentence when the commas are omitted. Does the following bother you less?

The parenthetical phrase is a great example of using an interrupter to great effect to clarify your ideas.

Turning to your second question:

Also, please provide me with parenthetical phrases with double commas that start with word "to" if possible.

"My son's teacher and I are planning to meet, to come up with a game plan for math remediation, among other things, early next week."

Not a very well written sentence, but I think it holds together, and I think it does what you requested. The parenthetical phrase is in italics.

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